Facilitating students to “learn from anywhere”

During the last 18 months, students have been given a taste of how digital learning can benefit them individually, and now there’s no putting the remote learning genie back into the bottle. How universities embrace and develop digital learning remains to be seen, but the evidence clearly points to a hybrid and remote teaching becoming an increasingly important part of the learning landscape. Whilst many learning experiences benefit from being a social activity, we’ve also known for years that ‘presenteeism’ just for the sake of it isn’t effective either. Many lectures and course materials that provide knowledge don’t have to be a campus activity, but crucially the peer-to-peer development of ideas and active learning benefit from small group in person activities. Click here to read more about the danger of being rooted in the past, the role of technology, and more

Hybrid learning space technology

Whilst pedagogies and learning design must be enabled by technology and not dictated, compromised or restrained by it, it is also true that being aware of what benefits to student outcomes can be supported by technology is also crucial. For emergency remote teaching there was no luxury of time to make informed decisions based on analysing data or research. The very essence of being an ‘emergency’ required us to simply start using what was already at our fingertips, even if we hadn’t the planning and training to put these tools to a different use. Now that we’ve identified that hybrid and remote learning will have an ongoing presence in higher education, providing students with the choices that many want, how do we ensure that the compromises experienced during emergency remote teaching are purposely replaced with solutions that maximise engagement, wellbeing, and accessibility for remote learners in immersive environments? Click here to read more about new hybrid learning spaces
Ajenta’s Vscene Teaching Wall - at USP College

Help creating YOUR hybrid learning spaces

For many institutions, hybrid learning, including emergency remote teaching, is currently outside their comfort zones. It’s often said that we need to step outside our comfort zones in order to develop ourselves and not be held back by fear. The real truth is not to step outside, but instead to expand our comfort zone until the things that we are unsure of or inexperienced with, become comfortable. What types of environments do we want to create that would be great for our students’ learning experiences? o Capacities o Technologies o Design, displays and desks o Universal ease of use How do we teach in these new spaces to ensure equity and engagement? Who determines which students are on campus and which join online? How do we incorporate inclusion, well-being and belonging as standard? How do we engage with our staff and students and incorporate their views before any decisions about the above are reached? Proven success Since innovating the Digital Classroom Roadshow in 2015 [that was subsequently re-branded as the Sticky Campus Roadshow and was assimilated into Jisc in 2018 for the benefit of its members], Duncan Peberdy has worked directly with universities and colleges across the UK to help them reach better informed decisions about their own learning space developments. Duncan’s month-long roadshows, that have been hosted by 23 universities, 5 FE colleges, and participated at 11 conferences, attracted in excess of 7,000 visitors to presentations and workshops on the development of small group active collaborative learning. We are now creating two active learning studios, one at each campus, that will be available for teaching in October. This has involved a cross-functional team that came together to host the Sticky Campus Roadshow and I do not think we would be in this position for at least another 2-3 years, if at all, without Duncan’s efforts and influence. Professor Paul Holland, Head of the Learning and Teaching Enhancement Centre, Swansea University The Digital Classroom Roadshow has been a critical initiative in support of our strategic Learning Landscape Change Programme, inspiring a range of innovative interdisciplinary Active Learning Projects across all faculties, which are already delivering positive student evaluations of these digital learning spaces. Professor Diane Hazlett, Director of the Centre for Higher Education Research & Practice, Ulster University A new hybrid focus During 2019, the Sticky Campus Roadshow incorporated the Barco Virtual Classroom, raising awareness and interest in hybrid and virtual learning, months before Covid19 was even a thing. Duncan had already identified the new opportunities to expand provision to part-time adult learners, workplace apprentices and perhaps even for prison education, and as Covid impacted learning, he started working closely with Intel and a few enthusiastic technology manufacturers; ViewSonic, Kramer and AVer, on the development of cost effective collaborations that could scale to support large volumes of students unable to access their campuses, colleges and schools. These partnerships spawned the Visual Learning Lab, a partnership with the City of Glasgow College to determine how such developments can assist the FE sector and its students. Why engage a specialist digital learning spaces Consultant? Bringing in an external consultant for staff consultations can result in more open and honest discussions, higher levels of engagement, and a greater perception of ‘being listened to.’ Having listened to you and your colleagues, better understood your existing culture and learning strategies, you will be presented with an appropriate range of hardware and software options with the pros and cons of each when it comes to cost, scalability, ease of use and support. The first step is often a proof-of-concept space that can be used for additional consultations and evaluations with staff and students, and we can liaise with EdTech suppliers to help you succeed or fail-fast with the least disruption. We can assist with the analytics against your Key Performance Indicators [KPI’s] that validate if the pre-deployment criteria were achieved. For an informal chat and to learn how Duncan Peberdy has helped other institutions with their development of digital learning spaces, please get in touch via email or phone: e: duncan@learnfromanywhere.co.uk m: 07887 628567

Facilitating students to “learn

from anywhere”

During the last 18 months, students have been given a taste of how digital learning can benefit them individually, and now there’s no putting the remote learning genie back into the bottle. How universities embrace and develop digital learning remains to be seen, but the evidence clearly points to a hybrid and remote teaching becoming an increasingly important part of the learning landscape. Whilst many learning experiences benefit from being a social activity, we’ve also known for years that ‘presenteeism’ just for the sake of it isn’t effective either. Many lectures and course materials that provide knowledge don’t have to be a campus activity, but crucially the peer- to-peer development of ideas and active learning benefit from small group in person activities. Click here to read more about the danger of being rooted in the past, the role of technology, and more
Ajenta’s Vscene Teaching Wall - at USP College

Help creating YOUR hybrid

learning spaces

For many institutions, hybrid learning, including emergency remote teaching, is currently outside their comfort zones. It’s often said that we need to step outside our comfort zones in order to develop ourselves and not be held back by fear. The real truth is not to step outside, but instead to expand our comfort zone until the things that we are unsure of or inexperienced with, become comfortable. What types of environments do we want to create that would be great for our students’ learning experiences? o Capacities o Technologies o Design, displays and desks o Universal ease of use How do we teach in these new spaces to ensure equity and engagement? Who determines which students are on campus and which join online? How do we incorporate inclusion, well-being and belonging as standard? How do we engage with our staff and students and incorporate their views before any decisions about the above are reached? Proven success Since innovating the Digital Classroom Roadshow in 2015 [that was subsequently re-branded as the Sticky Campus Roadshow and was assimilated into Jisc in 2018 for the benefit of its members], Duncan Peberdy has worked directly with universities and colleges across the UK to help them reach better informed decisions about their own learning space developments. Duncan’s month-long roadshows, that have been hosted by 23 universities, 5 FE colleges, and participated at 11 conferences, attracted in excess of 7,000 visitors to presentations and workshops on the development of small group active collaborative learning. We are now creating two active learning studios, one at each campus, that will be available for teaching in October. This has involved a cross-functional team that came together to host the Sticky Campus Roadshow and I do not think we would be in this position for at least another 2-3 years, if at all, without Duncan’s efforts and influence. Professor Paul Holland, Head of the Learning and Teaching Enhancement Centre, Swansea University The Digital Classroom Roadshow has been a critical initiative in support of our strategic Learning Landscape Change Programme, inspiring a range of innovative interdisciplinary Active Learning Projects across all faculties, which are already delivering positive student evaluations of these digital learning spaces. Professor Diane Hazlett, Director of the Centre for Higher Education Research & Practice, Ulster University A new hybrid focus During 2019, the Sticky Campus Roadshow incorporated the Barco Virtual Classroom, raising awareness and interest in hybrid and virtual learning, months before Covid19 was even a thing. Duncan had already identified the new opportunities to expand provision to part-time adult learners, workplace apprentices and perhaps even for prison education, and as Covid impacted learning, he started working closely with Intel and a few enthusiastic technology manufacturers; ViewSonic, Kramer and AVer, on the development of cost effective collaborations that could scale to support large volumes of students unable to access their campuses, colleges and schools. These partnerships spawned the Visual Learning Lab, a partnership with the City of Glasgow College to determine how such developments can assist the FE sector and its students. Why engage a specialist digital learning spaces Consultant? Bringing in an external consultant for staff consultations can result in more open and honest discussions, higher levels of engagement, and a greater perception of ‘being listened to.’ Having listened to you and your colleagues, better understood your existing culture and learning strategies, you will be presented with an appropriate range of hardware and software options with the pros and cons of each when it comes to cost, scalability, ease of use and support. The first step is often a proof-of-concept space that can be used for additional consultations and evaluations with staff and students, and we can liaise with EdTech suppliers to help you succeed or fail-fast with the least disruption. We can assist with the analytics against your Key Performance Indicators [KPI’s] that validate if the pre-deployment criteria were achieved. For an informal chat and to learn how Duncan Peberdy has helped other institutions with their development of digital learning spaces, please get in touch via email or phone: e: duncan@learnfromanywhere.co.uk m: 07887 628567
LEARN FROM ANYWHERE